Anti-bullying measures need to go back to the chalkboard

The NSPCC has said it is difficult for teachers to know whether a child is bullied.

But it should not come at the expense of schools forgetting they have a duty to provide children with a safe environment, the charity told the Times Educational Supplement.

A spokesperson wrote: “Ensuring your school has a robust and up-to-date bullying policy and promoting a no-tolerance approach is essential to stopping bullying in its tracks.

“It is also very important that any lessons and assemblies reflect the fact that children aren’t just verbally and physically bullied any more – bullying is also increasingly happening online, often giving bullies the chance to hide and become anonymous.

“It is vital that all members of staff working with young people know what action should be taken if bullying is suspected or reported, whether it is online or offline.

“It is also vital that teachers record all incidents and report patterns of bullying, which can really help to identify whether you need to update your policies and procedures.

Palmers advises a range of organisations, including schools, on employment issues, including bullying, which is not restricted to child-on-child cruelty and may occur between adults, including employer and employee. For information about the standards to which employers must adhere, please contact Lara Murray.